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currentsinbiology:

Non-genetic inheritance mechanisms - more epigenetics!
Semen secrets: How a previous sexual partner can influence another male’s offspring
Scientists have discovered a new form of non-genetic inheritance, showing for the first time that offspring can resemble a mother’s previous sexual partner – in flies at least. This confronting idea, known as telegony, dates back to ancient Greek times, but was discredited in the early 20th Century with the advent of genetics.
To test it out, UNSW Australia scientists Dr Angela Crean, Professor Russell Bonduriansky and Dr Anna Kopps manipulated the size of male flies and studied their offspring.
They found that the size of the young was determined by the size of the first male the mother mated with, rather than the second male that sired the offspring.

"Our discovery complicates our entire view of how variation is transmitted across generations, but also opens up exciting new possibilities and avenues of research. Just as we think we have things figured out, nature throws us a curve ball and shows us how much we still have to learn," says lead author Dr Crean.

The researchers propose that the effect is due to molecules in the seminal fluid of the first mate being absorbed by the female’s immature eggs and then influencing the growth of offspring of a subsequent mate.
The study is published in the journal Ecology Letters.
Caption: Neriid flies are depicted. Scientists at UNSW Australia have studied the flies and discovered a new form of non-genetic inheritance, showing for the first time that offspring can resemble a mother’s previous sexual partner. Credit: Image: Russell Bonduriansky

currentsinbiology:

Non-genetic inheritance mechanisms - more epigenetics!

Semen secrets: How a previous sexual partner can influence another male’s offspring

Scientists have discovered a new form of non-genetic inheritance, showing for the first time that offspring can resemble a mother’s previous sexual partner – in flies at least. This confronting idea, known as telegony, dates back to ancient Greek times, but was discredited in the early 20th Century with the advent of genetics.

To test it out, UNSW Australia scientists Dr Angela Crean, Professor Russell Bonduriansky and Dr Anna Kopps manipulated the size of male flies and studied their offspring.

They found that the size of the young was determined by the size of the first male the mother mated with, rather than the second male that sired the offspring.

"Our discovery complicates our entire view of how variation is transmitted across generations, but also opens up exciting new possibilities and avenues of research. Just as we think we have things figured out, nature throws us a curve ball and shows us how much we still have to learn," says lead author Dr Crean.

The researchers propose that the effect is due to molecules in the seminal fluid of the first mate being absorbed by the female’s immature eggs and then influencing the growth of offspring of a subsequent mate.

The study is published in the journal Ecology Letters.

Caption: Neriid flies are depicted. Scientists at UNSW Australia have studied the flies and discovered a new form of non-genetic inheritance, showing for the first time that offspring can resemble a mother’s previous sexual partner. Credit: Image: Russell Bonduriansky

(via somuchscience)

ryanpanos:

Sticks and Stones | David Chipperfield | Via

In BerlinMies van der Rohe’s Neue Nationalgalerie has begun a new phase with the opening of David Chipperfield’s intervention, a prologue to the imminent restoration which the famed British architect is about to undertake. Completed in 1968, the gallery was Mies’ last project and his final masterpiece; for nearly fifty years, nobody dared to touch it – until now. Marking this event is a large, site-specific installation, created by Chipperfield as an attempt to engage Mies in a spatial experiment (or perhaps a last, apologetic tribute to the 20th century master) moments before he is about to embark on a mission which will, inevitably, transform Mies’ ultimate legacy.

ensemblemiknawooj:

Restroom business is a serious business. #Chinatown, #oakland, #restrooms, #serious

ensemblemiknawooj:

Restroom business is a serious business. #Chinatown, #oakland, #restrooms, #serious

theoinglis:

Early 20th century Biritsh travel posters by painter Norman Wilkinson.

I’ve always been interested in the aesthetics of British art and design of this period, and Wilkinson is definitely of my favourites. He and a few of his peers developed a style that involves highly detailed and beautiful landscapes rendered in mainly flat colour. This gives the paintings a very modern and graphic look, reminiscent of the styles of many contemporary illustrators working in vectors rather than paint.

I’ve never managed to find anything that explains how this style came to be or why, but its definitely an interesting moment in the 20th century transition from artists and commercial artists to graphic designers and illustrators.

You can see more of these posters here.

Bonus fact: Wilkinson is credited as the inventor of dazzle ships, the crazy graphic camouflage that made ships simultaneously harder to spot and much more funky during the First World War.

currentsinbiology:

Non-genetic inheritance mechanisms - more epigenetics!
Semen secrets: How a previous sexual partner can influence another male’s offspring
Scientists have discovered a new form of non-genetic inheritance, showing for the first time that offspring can resemble a mother’s previous sexual partner – in flies at least. This confronting idea, known as telegony, dates back to ancient Greek times, but was discredited in the early 20th Century with the advent of genetics.
To test it out, UNSW Australia scientists Dr Angela Crean, Professor Russell Bonduriansky and Dr Anna Kopps manipulated the size of male flies and studied their offspring.
They found that the size of the young was determined by the size of the first male the mother mated with, rather than the second male that sired the offspring.

"Our discovery complicates our entire view of how variation is transmitted across generations, but also opens up exciting new possibilities and avenues of research. Just as we think we have things figured out, nature throws us a curve ball and shows us how much we still have to learn," says lead author Dr Crean.

The researchers propose that the effect is due to molecules in the seminal fluid of the first mate being absorbed by the female’s immature eggs and then influencing the growth of offspring of a subsequent mate.
The study is published in the journal Ecology Letters.
Caption: Neriid flies are depicted. Scientists at UNSW Australia have studied the flies and discovered a new form of non-genetic inheritance, showing for the first time that offspring can resemble a mother’s previous sexual partner. Credit: Image: Russell Bonduriansky

currentsinbiology:

Non-genetic inheritance mechanisms - more epigenetics!

Semen secrets: How a previous sexual partner can influence another male’s offspring

Scientists have discovered a new form of non-genetic inheritance, showing for the first time that offspring can resemble a mother’s previous sexual partner – in flies at least. This confronting idea, known as telegony, dates back to ancient Greek times, but was discredited in the early 20th Century with the advent of genetics.

To test it out, UNSW Australia scientists Dr Angela Crean, Professor Russell Bonduriansky and Dr Anna Kopps manipulated the size of male flies and studied their offspring.

They found that the size of the young was determined by the size of the first male the mother mated with, rather than the second male that sired the offspring.

"Our discovery complicates our entire view of how variation is transmitted across generations, but also opens up exciting new possibilities and avenues of research. Just as we think we have things figured out, nature throws us a curve ball and shows us how much we still have to learn," says lead author Dr Crean.

The researchers propose that the effect is due to molecules in the seminal fluid of the first mate being absorbed by the female’s immature eggs and then influencing the growth of offspring of a subsequent mate.

The study is published in the journal Ecology Letters.

Caption: Neriid flies are depicted. Scientists at UNSW Australia have studied the flies and discovered a new form of non-genetic inheritance, showing for the first time that offspring can resemble a mother’s previous sexual partner. Credit: Image: Russell Bonduriansky

(via somuchscience)

ryanpanos:

Sticks and Stones | David Chipperfield | Via

In BerlinMies van der Rohe’s Neue Nationalgalerie has begun a new phase with the opening of David Chipperfield’s intervention, a prologue to the imminent restoration which the famed British architect is about to undertake. Completed in 1968, the gallery was Mies’ last project and his final masterpiece; for nearly fifty years, nobody dared to touch it – until now. Marking this event is a large, site-specific installation, created by Chipperfield as an attempt to engage Mies in a spatial experiment (or perhaps a last, apologetic tribute to the 20th century master) moments before he is about to embark on a mission which will, inevitably, transform Mies’ ultimate legacy.

ensemblemiknawooj:

Restroom business is a serious business. #Chinatown, #oakland, #restrooms, #serious

ensemblemiknawooj:

Restroom business is a serious business. #Chinatown, #oakland, #restrooms, #serious

theoinglis:

Early 20th century Biritsh travel posters by painter Norman Wilkinson.

I’ve always been interested in the aesthetics of British art and design of this period, and Wilkinson is definitely of my favourites. He and a few of his peers developed a style that involves highly detailed and beautiful landscapes rendered in mainly flat colour. This gives the paintings a very modern and graphic look, reminiscent of the styles of many contemporary illustrators working in vectors rather than paint.

I’ve never managed to find anything that explains how this style came to be or why, but its definitely an interesting moment in the 20th century transition from artists and commercial artists to graphic designers and illustrators.

You can see more of these posters here.

Bonus fact: Wilkinson is credited as the inventor of dazzle ships, the crazy graphic camouflage that made ships simultaneously harder to spot and much more funky during the First World War.

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